Principii di economia corporativa.

Bologna, Nicola Zanichelli, 1938.

8vo, pp. [2] blank, [iii]-xix, 367, [1] blank; with 17 plates (14 printed in colour); lightly browned in places, light waterstain to inner margins of the final gathering; uncut in the original printed wrappers, a little soiled; a stamp affixed to the rear cover, dated 1940, announcing a price increase of this work by 5%.

£125

Approximately:
US $0€0

Make an enquiry

First edition of this work on mathematical economics. A mathematician by training, Amoroso (1886–1965) was inspired by Pareto to develop the relationship between pure economics and physics. ‘He also saw analogies between Heisenberg’s uncertainty principle and economic phenomena’ (The New Palgrave).

‘During the Fascist period he was able, unlike some colleagues, to continue working in Italy. His Principii, written during this period, has discussions of money and equilibrium quite free from political implications and, in the third part, an economic theory of Fascism stated in analytical terms, which remains within the mainstream of economic science’ (Who’s Who in Economics).

You may also be interested in...

TURGOT,

Anne Robert Jacques and DUPONT de NEMOURS, Pierre Samuel, ed. Oeuvres posthumes ... ou mémoire de M. Turgot, sur les administrations provinciales, mis en parallele avec celui de M. Necker, suivi d’une lettre sur ce plan, & des observations d’un républicain sur ces mémoires; & en général sur le bien qu’on doit attendre de ces administrations dans les monarchies.

First edition, published by Honoré Gabriel Mirabeau. The work was originally drawn up by DuPont de Nemours in 1776 under the title Mémoire sur les municipalités after a draft left by Turgot. The Lettre which begins on page 99 was written by DuPont de Nemours and the Observations (p. 113ff.) by Brissot de Warville. The work was reprinted in 1788.

Read more

[SAY.] HODGSON, Adam.

A Letter to M. Jean-Baptiste Say, on the comparative Expense of free and slave Labour.

First edition, presentation copy, inscribed ‘With the Author’s best respects’ on p. [iii]. Four years after the fourth edition of the Traité d’économie politique, Hodgson, an Anglican Evangelical writing on behalf of the Liverpool branch of the Society for Mitigating and Gradually Abolishing Slavery, upbraids Say for having denounced ‘the slave-system as unjustifiable’ while admitting ‘that in a pecuniary point of view it may be the most profitable’ (p. 1). Say (whose reply was published at the end of the second edition, also 1823) later agreed with Hodgson’s case for the uneconomical nature of slavery.

Read more