Memorie istoriche delle sacre teste de’ Santi Apostoli Pietro e Paolo e della loro solenne ricognizione nella Basilica Lateranense, con un’ appendice di documenti.

Rome, nella Stamperia della S.C. di Propaganda Fide, 1806.

4to, pp. vii, [1], 109, with engraved frontispiece, 6 engraved plates and 3 text engravings, title-page with engraved vignette; a very good copy printed on blue paper and bound in contemporary vellum, spine with gilt lettering.

£525

Approximately:
US $722€590

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First edition of a description of the relics of St. Paul and St. Peter, which after a long and adventurous history found their final resting place in the altar of the Lateran basilica in Rome. The book also illustrates and describes two new marble busts of St. Peter and St. Paul by the contemporary sculptor Luigi Acquisti. Leonardo Antonelli was a Cardinal who had assembled a choice collection of books and employed Francesco Cancellieri as his librarian.

Cicognara 3584; Lozzi 4147 (‘rara’).

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