Geschichte der Hohenzollernschen Staaten Hechingen und Sigmaringen von den ältesten Zeiten bis auf unsere Tage, durchaus nach Quellen bearbeitet … I. [– VIII.] Heft.

Sigmaringen, Bucher & Liener, 1834–6.

Eight parts, 8vo, pp. viii, 64; vi, 73, [1] blank + folding map; 63, [1] blank + folding map; 84 + large folding map; 93, [1] blank, [1] printed note, [1] blank; 80; [ii], 81–166; 68 + large folding coloured map; the occasional blemish, else a very nice, unsophisticated copy, uncut and partly unopened in the original printed wrappers, spines of some parts perished.

£350

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US $470€397

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First edition. Perched on the Zollenberg, just south of Hechingen, is the castle of Hohenzollern, which gave its name to the ruling house of Brandenburg–Prussia from 1415 to 1918, arguably the most powerful family in German history. The ancestral lands were divided in 1575 by Count Karl I among his three sons, thereby founding the three lines Hohenzollern-Hechingen, Hohenzollern-Sigmaringen, and Hohenzollern-Haigerloch (this last dying out in 1634 and its territory absorbed by Hohenzollern-Sigmaringen). The present work charts the early history of the area and the men who ruled it. In 1849, the two remaining principalities were united to form the Province of Hohenzollern, at the time the smallest in Prussia.

OCLC locates 3 copies only (Harvard, Syracuse, Wisconsin).

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