Mexican illustrations, founded upon facts; indicative of the present condition of society, manners, religion, and morals among the Spanish and native inhabitants of Mexico: with observations upon the government and resources of the republic of Mexico, as they appeared during part of the years 1825, 1826, and 1827. Interspersed with occasional remarks upon the climate, produce, and antiquities of the country, mode of working the mines, etc.

London, Carpenter & Son, 1828.

8vo, pp. xii, 310, with six plates and a map; illustrations in the text; half-title present; front free endpaper inscribed ‘B. Jackson Esq. With the author’s compliments’; occasional light browning and a few small spots; untrimmed in the original boards; rubbed and dulled, rebacked in calf, rear free endpaper torn away, upper joint cracked at head and foot.

£550

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First edition. This is a presentation copy, inscribed ‘Burr Jackson Esq. With the author’s compliments’ on the front free endpaper. Includes observations on slavery and the West Indies, visited on the author’s outward voyage.

Palau 25981; Sabin 4169.

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