ON INTEMPERANCE IN EATING AND DRINKING

Letters and Tracts on the Choice of Company and other Subjects. The second Edition.

London: Printed for J. Whiston and B. White … and R. and J. Dodsley … 1762.

8vo., pp. [2], xxxii, 304; a very good copy in contemporary mottled calf, morocco label, small crack to head of spine, stamped ‘Bond’ on front free endpaper.

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Second edition; a reissue of the sheets of the first edition with a cancel title-page and advertisement replacing the original title leaf A1. As well as the title tract, the volume includes essays ‘On Intemperance in Eating’, ‘On Intemperance in Drinking’, ‘On Pleasure’ and ‘On Public Worship’, and ‘A Letter to a Young Nobleman, Soon after his leaving School’, apparently written in 1737/8. The author was the Dean of Carlisle.

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