Principles of social science.

Philadelphia, J. B. Lippincott, 1858-1860.

Three vols, 8vo, pp. [ii], xxii + 474; [viii], xvi + 480; [iv], xvi + 511, [1]; very faint spotting to preliminaries, but an exceptionally fresh set, in the original embossed damson cloth, spines lettered in gilt, minor rubbing and spines lightly sunned.

£1500

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US $2015€1701

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First edition, a very attractive copy, of Carey’s principal work. ‘His treatment of social science was original, and led him to a series of supposed discoveries, the order of which he has stated in the introduction of his most important work The Principles of Social Science. His point of departure was a theory of value which he defined as the “measure of the resistance to be overcome in obtaining things required for use, or the measure of nature’s power over man” - in simple terms the cost of reproduction. This theory Carey applied to every case of value - to commodities, services, and in some passages seemingly to man himself’ (Palgrave).

IESS (1858-1860); for an account of the development of Carey’s thought see Palgrave I, p. 227 and Green, Henry Charles Carey p. 50 ff.

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