Catalogo istorico de’ pittori e scultori ferraresi e delle opere loro con in fine una nota esatta delle piu celebri pitture delle chiese di Ferrara.

Ferrara, per Francesco Pomatelli, 1782-83

4 vols bound in 2, large 8vo, pp. 42, 197, [1]; vi, 246, [2]; vi. 326, [2]; 344, [2]; with together 25 engraved portraits by Luigi Ughi, and each volume with engraved title-page enclosed by floral border also by Ughi; a fine copy in contemporary vellum, spine with contrasting red and green morocco labels, gilt, red marbled edges.

£2850

Approximately:
US $3854€3211

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First edition of the most important source book on artistic life in Ferrara then published. Cesare Citadella (1732-1809), a painter, priest, and curator of the natural history cabinet affiliated to Ferrara University, compiled his work by using the unpublished manuscript of Girolamo Baruffaldi who had assembled material on Ferrara’s artists in the early 18th century (cf. Comolli, Bibliografia, (1788), I, pp. 209-216)). There is however, much original work by Citadella who gives a chronological account of Ferrara painters, sculptors, and engravers. Each Life is followed by a long list of the artist’s works to be found in Ferrara; the artistic output is critically evaluated. Baruffaldi’s book was only published in 1844-46.

Schlosser Magnino pp. 531, 584; Cicognara 2240; Lozzi 1663.

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