Printed trade label. ‘Thomas Fentham, Carver, Gilder, and Picture-Frame Maker, at No. 52, opposite Old Round Court, Strand, London. Sells all Sorts of Picture, Print and Looking-Glass Frames, of any colour to match Rooms; various Sorts of Green and Gold Dressing-Glasses, rich Girandoles, &c. and Green and Blue Venetian Window-Blinds. Old Pictures and Prints cleaned, lined, repaired, and secured from Dust. [

London, after 1779 and before 1794

Trade label (72 x 68 mm), pasted on verso of linen backed print: ‘Cupid Sleeping. From a painting of Guido Reni, in the Collection of Sir Laurence Dundas Bar.’ Engraved by Robert Strange, cut close to plate mark (380 x 440 mm).

£500

Approximately:
US $0€0

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Thomas Fentham (1774-1808) ‘was a leading looking glass and picture framer in the Strand, whose business was carried on after his death by his son’.

The label offered here is not known to the National Portrait Gallery’s Directory of British Frame makers (online). They know of two different worded labels from this address.

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