Berlin Stories.

New York: New Directions, [1945].

8vo., pp. 207; original tan cloth, lettered in black on spine; one tiny graze to spine panel, owner’s inscription on endpaper, otherwise a fine copy in a handsome dust-jacket with minor wear to folds.

£150

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First American edition to combine the two Berlin novels, originally published by the Hogarth Press as Mr Norris Changes Trains and Goodbye to Berlin, in 1935 and 1939 respectively.

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