The theatre of war in the Kingdom of Bohemia, drawn from the survey of J. C. Muller Captain Engineer to the Emperor: to which is annexed the Duchy of Silesia and Marquisates of Moravia and Lusatia, compiled from the German maps. By Thomas Jefferys, geographer to his Royal Highness the Prince of Wales.

[London], Thomas Jefferys, 6 June 1757.

500 x 600 mm, engraved map, coloured in outline; not, as is usual, dissected and mounted on linen.

£500

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This map, issued at the beginning of the Seven Years’ War, illustrates the route taken by Frederick the Great’s Prussian forces against those of Saxony and Prussia, up to the opening of siege operations against Prague. On 18 June 1757, Count von Daun, in attempting to raise this siege, overpowered Frederick’s forces at the battle of Kolin. It was the first time that Prussian king had been defeated on the field. Most of the land fighting of the Seven Years’ War, which ended in 1763, took place in the territories depicted in this map.

The Theatre of war is signed ‘Tho. Jefferys’ under the cartouche at upper right corner. The publisher explained his reasons for signing each copy of this map on the engraved slipcase label found with dissected versions of the map, which states: ‘As the public was greatly impressed upon, and myself much injured, by a pirated copy of my Pocket Mirror for North America, I have written my name upon every copy of this map, to prevent the like imposition, and injury’.

BM Maps 27200(25.). Only one copy found on COPAC, at the British Library.


T2912

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