NICOLAUS, of Damascus. Ex Nicolai Damasceni universali historia seu de moribus gentium libris excepta Iohannis Stobaei collectanea, quae Nicolaus Cragius latina fecit, et seorsum edidit.

[?Heidelberg], Pierre de Saint-André, 1593.

4to, pp. 23, Greek and Latin text on facing pages, with a woodcut printer’s device on title; modern boards.

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First edition thus. Comprises observations on the customs of different peoples (Iberians, Celts, Phrygians, Assyrians, Spartans and so on) from the Augustan historian Nicolaus of Damascus’ Universal history, only fragments of which have come down to us (in this case via Stobaeus). The text is printed here in the original Greek together with a Latin translation by the Danish historian and philologist Niels Krag (or Cragius, c. 1550–1602).

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