Sir Isaac Newton’s tables for renewing and purchasing the leases of cathedral-churches and colleges, according to the several rates of interest: with their construction and use explained. Also tables for renewing and purchasing the leases of land or houses, very necessary and useful for all purchasers, but especially those who are any way concerned in church or college leases. To which is added, the value of church and college leases consider’d, and the advantage to the lessees made very apparent. By a late Bishop of Chichester. To which are also added, tables of interest exactly computed at 3, 3 ½, 4, and 5 per cent. With other useful tables.

London, printed for Thomas Astley, 1742

Two parts in one volume, as issued, 12mo, pp. 4, 81, [3], 85-107, [1, advertisement]; [4] of 6, lacking a preliminary leaf, 102, with numerous tables and diagrams in the text; light offsetting to endpapers, else a very good copy in contemporary sheep, gilt morocco lettering piece to the spine; joints cracked, losses to corners and upper board; signature of Thomas Astley on the verso of the initial title-page and on the title-page of the third part.

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Sixth edition, first published in 1686, this issue was sometimes also published with a separate title page and imprint reading, ‘The money’d man’s pocket-book’, London, 1742’ immediately preceding the title-page of the second part. A series of tables calculating the amounts owed on leases based on varying interest rates and time periods. The author also includes tables for the calculation of fines for late payment based on varying interest rates. The third section, ‘tables of interest…’ calculates the interest due on loans of set amounts given an interest rate of 3, 3 ½, 4, or 5 per cent. Amongst the useful tables mentioned at the end of the title, is a series of Tables of Brokerage and Commission.

Sometimes erroneously attributed to Sir Isaac Newton, the work is by George Mabbut, who also wrote ‘A true estimate of the value of leasehold estates, and of annuities and reversions for lives and years’, in 1731 which purported to be an answer to Newton’s Tables for renewing and purchasing leases’, in fact written by himself.

ESTC T18621; Goldsmiths’ 7889 and 7923 (second part, with a note detailing that it was published to be bound with the first part); Hanson 3130n. Not in Kress.

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