Jerusalem oder über religiöse Macht und Judenthum.

Frankfurt and Leipzig, n. p., 1787.

8vo, pp. 183, [1] blank; some light foxing, more so to the first and last few leaves; contemporary half calf, spine blindstamped in compartments, paper spine label.

£250

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First posthumous edition, originally published in 1783 by Friedrich Maurer in Berlin, of this later work by Mendelssohn (1729–1786), in which he supports religious and political toleration, and advocates separation of church and state and civil equality for Jews. The work was reprinted as recently as 2001.

Goedeke IV/1, 489,12; Ziegenfuss II, 150.

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