Catalogue des statues en bronze exposées dans une grande salle du Musée Bourbon á Naples.

Naples, 1820

8vo, pp. 40, uncut, in old wrappers.

£150

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Uncommon pocket guide to the antique bronzes of the then Real Museo Borbonico in Naples. The bronzes described here were either excavated at Pompeii or Herculaneum or came from the Farnese collection. The critical descriptions give a wealth of information.

COPAC only locates the Oxford copy; OCLC only locates the Pennsylvania copy in US; and ICCU locates only a copy in Naples.

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