THE IRONMASTER

The Battles of Life. The Ironmaster. From the French of Georges Ohnet … by Lady G[eorgiana] O[sborne]. Authorized Translation …

London: Wyman & Sons … 1884.

3 vols., 8vo., with all half-titles; original scarlet cloth decorated in black, spines lettered gilt, slightly faded, a couple of wormholes to the joints, but a very good copy.

£450

Approximately:
US $619€506

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First edition in English. Le maître de forges (1882), one of a series of novels published by Ohnet under the title ‘Les batailles de la vie’, was a bestseller of French nineteenth-century sentimental fiction, and no less successful in England. Another English translation, by Ernest Vizetelly, published by his father Henry, appeared the same year.

‘The nobly-born heroine is jilted by her ducal fiancé and marries the rich ironmaster Philippe Derblay, who has all the virtues except an apostrophe in his name. She treats him with shameful arrogance but is worn down by his cold politeness and in the end comes adoringly to heel’ (Oxford Companion to French Literature).

Not in Sadleir; only a yellowback in Wolff (under ‘Hénot’).

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