Album containing plates from the Grand Oppenord and several rare proof plates.

Paris, chez Huquier, [c. 1740].

Large folio (605 x 450 mm), 54 plates engraved by Gabriel Huquier after Oppenord; a few cut close to the plate margin, inlaid, mounted or with small imperfections (see below); bound in mottled calf, c. 1830s, in the style of an 18th-century binding, gilt border on covers, gilt inner borders, richly gilt spine, with contrasting labels.

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An interesting album containing plates from the Grand Oppenord, Huquier’s important publication issuing the ornament designs of Oppenord in print. Oppenord (1672-1742) was an important contributor to the development of the rococo style in Europe, adapting Italian baroque ornament to suit French taste. Upon his return from Italy, where he had lived for seven years, he was made premier architect of the Duc de’Orleans.

Our album contains the following plates:

Self-portrait of Oppenord (inlaid); and two proof plates on full sheets of the portrait cartouche, with imprint line, but without portrait or lettering, one with mss. title of a different publication (3 plates).
Title-page to the Grand Oppenord, cut close with small mended tears at foot (inlaid), and proof plate of title-page on full sheet, with imprint line, but without lettering (2).
Avis plate cut close, loosing imprint line, with small loss at top right corner, and ownership ink stamp of C.D. Allard (inlaid); and proof plate of Avis on full sheet, with imprint line but without lettering (2)
Plates LL2-6 Livre de Décorations d’Appartemens; with LL2 cut close and inlaid, the rest with large margins but inlaid to fit folio size (5).
Plates MM1, 2, 3, 5, 6 Livre de differents Obelisques; all cut close and inlaid, MM2 loosing imprint line (5).
Plates NN2, 6, 7 Livre d’Autels; cut close and inlaid, with NN2 loosing imprint line and with loss on right margin (3).
Plates OO1, 2, 5, 6 Livres de Fragments d’Architecture; OO6 cut close and inlaid, with mended tear (4).
Plates PP1, 3, 4, 5 Livre de fragments d’Architecture ; PP3 with loss to left corner, filled with mss. pen facsimile of sky (4).
Plates QQ1-6 Livre de differentes Fragments d’Architecture, RR1-6 Livre de differentes Décorations d’Architecture et Appartemens, SS1-6 Livre de differentes Décorations d’Apartements ; all on full sheets (24).
A double-page plate entitle Vue d’une fontaine de Corinth’(1).
An other unsigned cartouche, cut close with no imprint line (1).

Berlin Kat. 384; Millard, French Books, 127; Guilmard, p. 143; RIBA, Early Printed Books, Vol. V, no. 4038.

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