Vue générale de la chaine des Alpes.

Neuchâtel, F.W. Moritz, n.d. [c. 1815].

Panorama, 17 x 330cm, in 6 joined sections, all with contemporary hand colouring; with captions, table of distance from Neuchâtel, altitude and geological details of each mountain depicted; in very good condition, rolled.

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A splendid panorama of the Alps, extremely rare, taken from Neuchâtel, ranging from Mount Pilatus (Emmental Alps) to Le Môle (Haute-Savoie) and including the Eiger, the Jungfrau and Mont Blanc.

Manuel du voyageur en Suisse (Zurich, 1819), p.40; Nouvel itinéraire portatif de Suisse (Paris, 1827), p.68.

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