GETTING INTO A STORM WITH STURM

Defensiones duae, quibus D. Ioannis Sturmii rectoris Antipappis duobus respondetur, Maiori, & Epitomico. De charitate, et condemnatione Christiana, secunda. De libro concordiae, et de confessione ecclesiae Argentinensis, tertia.

Tübingen, Georgius Gruppenbachius, 1580.

4to, pp. 146, [2 blank]; a few passages in German and Greek; woodcut device to title, woodcut initials; a few spots, light browning; a very good copy in modern plain paper wrappers.

£950

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US $1307€1069

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Rare first edition of Pappus’s most important work in his pamphlet war with Johannes Sturm over the Lutheran Formula of Concord and its imposition in Strasburg. Pappus (1549-1610) studied in Tübingen and Basel before becoming professor of Hebrew and then of history at Strasburg. In 1578 he was appointed professor of theology and pastor of Strasburg minster. His advocacy for the Lutheran confession over the Tetrapolitan brought him into a long-running conflict with Johannes Sturm (1507-89), beginning with Sturm’s 1578 Antipappus to which the Defensiones duae was Pappus’s reply. The dispute ended in 1581 when Pappus succeeded as head of the church in Strasburg after the death of Johann Marbach and promptly suppressed the remnants of Reformed practice and enforced Lutheranism.
 
VD16 P327. Rare: Worldcat records only three copies in the UK and the US (Oxford, Harvard, Luther Seminary).

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