Richard Hakluyt. A guide to his books and to those associated with him, 1580–1625.

[London], Quaritch, 2008.

8vo (210 x 150 mm), pp. [iv], 116, with 18 full-page illustrations; pictorial card wrappers.

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In this guide various approaches to Hakluyt’s books are suggested under a number of interrelated headings – his patronage and connections; Italian and French influences; his use of illustration and his presentation of texts; his intentions; and his impact and readership. It is hoped that it will aid a broad appreciation of Hakluyt’s work and the nature of his achievement, notably that his part in the publication of over twenty-five travel books marks a contribution to travel literature far beyond the Principal navigations . . . and discoveries of the English nation for which he is chiefly famous. Extensive notes are provided to indicate further primary and secondary references and, finally, there is a bibliography of the books by or otherwise associated with Hakluyt published between 1580 and 1625.

ISBN: 978-0-9550852-7-7.

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