THE FIRST APPEARANCE OF ‘THE RAPE OF THE LOCK’THE FIRST AND SECOND EDITIONS TOGETHER

Miscellaneous Poems and Translations. By Several Hands ...

London: Printed for Bernard Lintott ... 1712 [and 1714].

8vo., pp. [8, half-title, title and prelims of 1712]; [4, half-title and title of 1714], 322, [2], 321-344, [2], 345-376, [8, Lintot catalogue dated 1712], [2], 377-424, with an engraved frontispiece; a very good copy in contemporary speckled panelled calf, neatly rebacked.

£2750

Approximately:
US $3678€3116

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First edition of one of the most celebrated miscellanies of the eighteenth-century, which includes the first printing of The Rape of the Lock, in its preliminary version of two cantos, as well as five other poems by Pope, and contributions by Dryden, Broome, Fenton, and Prior. Ault has argued for Pope’s editorship. This copy is more than perfect, containing all the sheets of 1712, as well as those added in 1714, with none of the intended cancellations (see below).

As originally issued, there was a gap in pagination between p. 320 and p. [353], sheets Y and Z, possibly intended for Windsor Forest and an Ode for Musick, though Foxon argues otherwise. By this narrative Pope did not finish the final version of Windsor Forest until late in 1712, Lintot became impatient, and the last-minute withdrawal of the one poem necessarily involved withdrawing the other. After this gap the volume concluded with The Rape of the Lock, pages [353]-376, followed by the four leaves of advertisements.

Two years later Lintot reissued the miscellany with a cancel half-title and title-page (this time naming Pope explicitly) and a number of additional new leaves. This ‘second Edition’ comprises the original sheets up to p. 320, then Windsor Forest and an Ode for Musick newly printed as pp. 321-52 (plus three extra singleton insertions: a fly-title to each poem, and a leaf with ‘Upon a Girl of Seven Years old’ and the risqué ‘Epigram upon Two or Three’), then the original sheets again of pages [353]-376 (The Rape of the Lock), followed finally by An Essay on Criticism, pages 377-424, newly printed. Y8 is a cancel, and some copies have an errata leaf (not present here).

The complexity of all the new insertions made the 1714 reissue a nightmare for binders – the majority of the copies listed in ESTC are in some way imperfect, and see our Catalogue 1188 for a copy of 1712 with the 1714 prelims bound in front and all the remaining new material at the end. Here, the binder had more success, though without cancelling the original title-page and prelims as was intended. All the contents of both issues are present, including the pages most often lacking in 1714 (‘Upon a Girl …’ and the Lintot catalogue, now out of date).

Case 260(1)(a) [and 260(1)(b)]; Griffith 6 [and 32]; Rothschild 1565. See also Foxon, Pope and the Early Eighteenth-Century Book Trade, p. 37, for a long explanation of the genesis and compostion of the 1714 reissue.

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