Must children die and mothers plead in vain? Buy More Liberty Bonds.

New York, Sakett & Wilhelms Corp., [1918].

Lithograph in colour, 31 ¼ x 41 in (79 ½ x 104 cm); professionally-restored tears to margins, restored chip to left margin; linen backed; a very good copy.

£400

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This poster was produced to for the sale of the third or fourth liberty loans in 1918, which saw the printing of 9 and 10 million promotional posters produced, respectively. The large-scale of the effort was seen to reflect a turning point in war advertising. As the US was an immigrant nation, the Federal government was initially hesitant to promote patriotism outright, fearing a backlash, however, the great success enjoyed by war and liberty bond advertising is now seen to be an early abstract sense of patriotism (Aulich, War posters, p. 55)

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