A Letter to M. Jean-Baptiste Say, on the comparative Expense of free and slave Labour.

8vo, pp. [iv], 55, [1] blank, 17, [1] blank; disbound.

£550

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First edition, presentation copy, inscribed ‘With the Author’s best respects’ on p. [iii]. Four years after the fourth edition of the Traité d’économie politique, Hodgson, an Anglican Evangelical writing on behalf of the Liverpool branch of the Society for Mitigating and Gradually Abolishing Slavery, upbraids Say for having denounced ‘the slave-system as unjustifiable’ while admitting ‘that in a pecuniary point of view it may be the most profitable’ (p. 1). Say (whose reply was published at the end of the second edition, also 1823) later agreed with Hodgson’s case for the uneconomical nature of slavery.

Goldsmiths’ 23958; Kress C.1077; Ragatz, p. 513; this edition not in Black or Sabin; not in Einaudi.

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