THE CHARGE OF THE LIGHT BRIGADE

Maud, and other Poems …

London: Edward Moxon … 1855.

8vo., pp. [8], 154, [2], with 8 pp. of publisher’s advertisements (dated August 1855) between the front pastedown and free endpaper; uncut in original blind-stamped green ribbed cloth, spine lettered gilt; ink ownership inscription of M. A. Reynolds, dated Oxford 1855, small nick to spine.

£150

Approximately:
US $200€169

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First edition, containing the first appearance in book form of ‘The Charge of the Light Brigade’. The poem was originally printed in The Examiner in December 1854.

This is the corrected issue. Maud was published on 28 July in an impression of 10,000 copies. On 1 August, Emily Tennyson sent Moxon three minor corrections, which were probably made when a further 2000 further copies were struck off in response to public demand for the book. A second edition was required before the end of the year.

Wise, Tennyson, 58; Tinker 2080. See The Letters of Alfred Lord Tennyson, ed. Lang and Shannon, vol. II, p. 116.

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