La locanda commedia da rappresentarsi in Firenze nel Teatro di Via del Cocomero nell’autunno dell’anno 1756.

Florence, Pietro Gaetano Viviani, 1756.

12mo, pp. 128; woodcut vignette on title with motto a tempo infuocati; running headline cropped on one page, but a very good copy, in modern marbled wrappers, edges sprinkled blue.

£700

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Sole edition, extremely rare (no other copy listed in library catalogues), of this three-act comedy, a notable example of the new Italian comedy inspired by Goldoni. This work appears to echo Goldoni’s La vedova scaltra (1748), while developing the plot and the theme along original trajectories. The most recognizable persona of the servant in the Commedia dell’Arte, Arlecchino, for example, features here in the unusual role of landlord, and the dynamics of the comedy of errors involve such characters as an English merchant, a German colonel, a French gentlemen, each linguistically marked with mock-national traits in the dialogues.

The woodcut in the title refers to the Accademia degli infuocati, the company of actors associated with the Teatro del Cocomero (today Teatro Niccolini).

No copies located in COPAC, Worldcat or ICCU.

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