A series of prints of Roman History, designed as ornaments for those apartments in which children receive the first rudiments of their education.

London, John Marshall, 1789.

24mo, pp. [2]; LXIV full-page engraved plates; a little light offsetting to the first and last leaves, else a very good copy in contemporary sheep, paper label to upper board, joints cracked, small losses to spine ends, corners rubbed; armorial die-sinker style bookplate of Thomas Parker to the free end paper, his autograph to the front pastedown.

£125

Approximately:
US $172€140

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First edition. Sarah Trimmer was an educational reformer, and philanthropist, being particularly interested in the education of the poor. She was a keen advocate of the didactic use of pictures, as exemplified in the present work, which is the third in a series of six series of prints on different topics of world and biblical history, produced in collaboration with the noted publisher of cheap popular prints, John Marshall & Co. An accompanying text volume to each series was also issued. Sold in three states, pre-pasted on to board for display, sewed in marbled paper for the pocket, or bound in red leather, the present copy would seem to be the second variant, rebound on entering Parker’s library.

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