Compendio utilissimo di quelle cose, le quali a nobili e christiani mercanti appartengono.

Milan, Giovan Antonio degli Antonij, 1561.

8vo, ff. 16, 128; first three leaves repaired in the lower margin (not touching text), light foxing to some pages, some waterstaining in the lower margin of the last few quires, but a good copy in early eighteenth-century stiff vellum, flat spine with red morocco lettering-piece; vellum on the spine cracked but repaired, somewhat soiled; early ownership inscriptions on the title-page, including the date 1717.

£2000

Approximately:
US $2675€2266

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First edition, containing Discorso d’intorno alla Mercantia and Trattato del Cambio di Lione o di Bisenzone and Trattato de’ Cambi, and including the Italian translation of Saravia de la Calle’s Institutione de’ Mercanti.

‘Venusti examines into the elements of a just price which he considers to be the one prevailing at the time and place of a contract - the circumstances of selling and buying, the quantity of goods and money, the number of buyers and sellers, and the convenience and usefulness of the bargain, according to the judgement of upright men incapable of dishonesty. [He] makes a minute analysis of these elements, illustrating them by the theory of supply and demand, and to some extent opposing this by the theory of cost of production, asserting that giusto prezzo springs from abundance or scarcity of goods, and of merchants and money, not from cost, labour, or risk’ (Palgrave III, p. 618).

EHB 699; Kress Italian, 34; not in Einaudi or Goldsmiths’.

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