Thérèse, a fragment.

The Roxburghe Club, 1981.

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Edited with an introduction by Desmond Flower. The Roxburghe Club, 1981. A facsimile reproduction, with transcription, of the eight pages of autograph manuscript which are all that survive of Therèse, a play written when Voltaire was nearing the height of his powers. Desmond Flower’s introduction outlines the circumstances of the play’s creation and considers why it was never publicly performed.

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