The Principles and Practise of Sketching Landscape Scenery from Nature, systematically arranged and illustrated by numerous examples, from simple and easy subjects, to the more complicated and difficult combinations of objects. In four parts.

London, printed for the author, 1813 [-1815].

4 parts bound in one vol., oblong folio; pp. iv, 18, and 16 plates of soft-ground etchings; pp. 16, and 16 plates; pp. 8, and 16 plates; pp. 14, [2], and 16 plates; together 64 soft-ground etchings, one with 6 overslips demonstrating variations of light and shade; a very good copy in contemporary limp calf, covers with ornamental blind-stamped border, a little worn at extremities, upper cover with gold-tooled title panel, rebacked and with new endpapers.

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First edition of J. G. Wood’s last and most ambitious drawing book. Wood was a landscape painter speciallising in watercolour and exhibited at the Royal Academy between 1793 and 1811. Here his drawing lessons deal with sketching cottage scenery, trees and woods, village streets, and general views incorporating grandiose landscape settings and glimpses of houses and villages. Some plates have faint perspective lines drawn on to enable the student to understand the correct perspective.

The work was originally issued in four parts with wrappers. This copy was bound up at the time with the owner writing at the opening of each part a title which no doubt appeared on the printed wrappers. A fourth edition was issued in 1833, all are uncommon.

Abbey, Life, 194 (third edition (1820)).

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