A catalogue of the pictures at Grosvenor House, London; with etchings of the whole collection … and accompanied by historical notices …

London, printed by W. Bulmer and W. Nicol, published by the proprietor, May 12, 1820

Large 4to, pp. [8], 46, [2], and 143 etchings on 46 sheets; a very good, crisp and uncut copy, bound in contemporary half black morocco and red boards. Armorial bookplate of Sir Charles Cockerell (1755-1837), banker, who spent a large part of his life in Calcutta, and upon his return, built one of the most ambitious Indian style houses in England, Sezincote, in Gloucestershire.

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First edition and earliest catalogue of the Grovenor picture collection finely printed by Bulmer, and with reproductive etchings of all the pictures by Young. The Grosvenor picture collection was one of the finest in London. The Earl of Grosvenor employed the King’s Keeper of Pictures as his agent in Italy, but also patronised the English School, with paintings by Gainsborough, West (‘Death of Wolfe’), Wilson and Stubbs. His son Robert added choice pictures from Madrid, the entire collection of Welbore Ellis Agar, a Rembrandt from the King of Sardinia, a couple of Rubens’ from the Convent of Loeches, a Titian from the Barberini Gallery, etc.

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