PARRY, ROSS, AND THE NORTHWEST PASSAGE

from the Discovery of America by Columbus to the present Time.

London: William Darton and Son … 1831.

8vo., pp. x, 284, with an additional engraved title page (foxed), frontispiece; possibly wanting the half title; a very good copy in the original dark red morocco, embossed with a design by J. Davis, gilt edges; front joint cracked, spine slightly worn; ownership inscription dated 1834.

£250

Approximately:
US $322€289

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from the Discovery of America by Columbus to the present Time.

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First and only edition of a compendium of exploration and discovery for children, taking in Columbus, Drake, Parry, Look, Franklin etc. True to its promise to record adventures up ‘to the present time’, the most recent voyage recorded here is Captain Ross’s attempt to discover the North-West passage. With ‘what degree of success … is not yet known’ – Ross did not return to England until 1833. An Account was also issued as the first volume of Darton’s Juvenile Cyclopaedia (Darton H832).

Darton H6.

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