A Monthly Magazine … Volume 1, Number 1 [– Number 6] [all published].

Washington, D.C., John Basil Barnhill, 1912–14.

Six numbers in one vol., 8vo, pp. 80; bound with five other, related items (see below) in contemporary cloth, very slightly sunned.

£300

Approximately:
US $409€336

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A Monthly Magazine … Volume 1, Number 1 [– Number 6] [all published].

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Scarce complete run of The American Anti-Socialist, ‘An Organ of Jeffersonian Democracy’, edited and published by the libertarian writer John B. Barnhill (1864–1929). Barnhill also edited other journals, such as The Eagle and Serpent, Nationalist, and Humanity First.

The other items included in the volume are:

i) [drop-head title:] Socialism means the Abolition of Family Life. [London, Liberty and Property Defence League, n. d.]
8vo, pp. 4, [2].

ii) O’BRIEN, M. D. [drop-head title:] Private Property; or, Old-Fashioned Folly and New Philosophy. [London, Liberty and Property Defence League, n. d.]
8vo, pp. 4.

iii) PLUMPTRE, Constance E. [drop-head title:] What do we owe the State? [London, Liberty and Property Defence League, n. d.]
8vo, pp. [2].

iv) LOTT, Edson S. [drop-head title:] Fallacies of Compulsory Social Insurance. [New York?, n. p., c.1916].
8vo, pp. 12.

v) LARMOUR, Robert. The Impossible Vagaries of Socialism. Its Fallacies and Illusions. Stratford, Ontario, by the author, c.1911.
8vo, pp. 86; original printed wrappers preserved.

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