Principii di economia corporativa.

Bologna, Nicola Zanichelli, 1938.

8vo, pp. xix, [1] blank, 367, [1] blank; with 17 plates (14 coloured); edges lightly browned; a good copy, uncut and partly unopened in the original printed wrappers, a little soiled.

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First edition. A mathematician by training, Amoroso (1886–1965) was inspired by Pareto to develop the relationship between pure economics and classical mechanics. ‘He also saw analogies between Heisenberg’s uncertainty principle and economic phenomena’ (The New Palgrave).

‘During the Fascist period he was able, unlike some colleagues, to continue working in Italy. His Principii, written during this period, has discussions of money and equilibrium quite free from political implications and, in the third part, an economic theory of Fascism stated in analytical terms, which remains within the mainstream of economic science’ (Who’s Who in Economics).

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