Principii di economia corporativa.

Bologna, Nicola Zanichelli, 1938.

8vo, pp. [2] blank, [iii]-xix, 367, [1] blank; with 17 plates (14 printed in colour); lightly browned in places, light waterstain to inner margins of the final gathering; uncut in the original printed wrappers, a little soiled; a stamp affixed to the rear cover, dated 1940, announcing a price increase of this work by 5%.

£125

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US $175€141

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First edition of this work on mathematical economics. A mathematician by training, Amoroso (1886–1965) was inspired by Pareto to develop the relationship between pure economics and physics. ‘He also saw analogies between Heisenberg’s uncertainty principle and economic phenomena’ (The New Palgrave).

‘During the Fascist period he was able, unlike some colleagues, to continue working in Italy. His Principii, written during this period, has discussions of money and equilibrium quite free from political implications and, in the third part, an economic theory of Fascism stated in analytical terms, which remains within the mainstream of economic science’ (Who’s Who in Economics).

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