The History of British Journalism, from the Foundation of the Newspaper Press in England, to the Repeal of the Stamp Act in 1855, with Sketches of Press Celebrities … with an Index.

London, R. Clay for Richard Bentley, 1859.

2 vols, 8vo, pp. I: viii, 339, [1 (blank)], II: [4], 365, [1 (blank)]; very short marginal tear to title vol. I; a very good set in publisher’s red grained cloth by Westley’s & Co, London, boards blocked in blind, spines lettered in gilt; spines sunned, slight rubbing and bumping; modern booklabel of John E.C. Palmer to upper pastedowns.

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The History of British Journalism, from the Foundation of the Newspaper Press in England, to the Repeal of the Stamp Act in 1855, with Sketches of Press Celebrities … with an Index.

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First edition of a detailed study of British newspapers. The first comprehensive history of the subject, the text is derived from close study of the British Museum’s collections, from the sixteenth century to the mid-nineteenth.

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