TIPS FOR TRICKY LAWYERS

Law Quibbles, or a treatise of the evasions, tricks, turns and quibbles, commonly used in the profession of the law … The second edition.

Dublin, Samuel Fairbrother, 1724.

8vo, pp. [6], 85, [3], 50; ‘An Essay on the amendment, and reduction, of the laws’ has a separate title-page and pagination; some scattered foxing and soiling, withal a good copy in late eighteenth-century calf; early ownership inscription to title-page, armorial crest to spine of the Irish general George Forbes, sixth Earl of Granard; stamps to title versos of the American lawyer and activist J. Wesley Miller.

£275

Approximately:
US $306€312

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Law Quibbles, or a treatise of the evasions, tricks, turns and quibbles, commonly used in the profession of the law … The second edition.

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First Dublin edition, first printed in London in the same year and several times reprinted.

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