The Dutch drawn to the life…

London, for Thomas Johnson and H. Marsh, 1664.

12mo, pp. [10], 156, with engraved frontispiece of William Prince of Orange; full-page contemporary engravings of Ferdinand Alvarez de Toledo, Duke of Alba to the front pastedown with coat of arms pasted at head, and a Dutch winter scene picturing skating, horse and carriages on ice and other activities to the rear pastedown; toned throughout, a few small marks and creases, still a good copy in contemporary sheep, worn, modern reback with red morocco label.

£975

Approximately:
US $1331€1094

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The Dutch drawn to the life…

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First edition. The book is written as a series of questions and answers, covering everything one could ever wish to know about the Dutch and their nation from their general character, social life and customs to physical details of the individual provinces, trade and industry, politics and government, religion, welfare, an account of the deeds of the Prince of Orange and the creation of the Free State, and history and Anglo-Dutch relations from 1612 to the present day, focusing particularly on the miracle of Dutch power and prosperity.

Kress 1133; Goldsmiths’ 1723; Lowndes, ii, p. 948; Wing D 2898.

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