A SUBSCRIBER’S COPY

A Voyage round the World, in the Years MDCCXL, I, II, III, IV ... Compiled from Papers and Other Materials of the Right Honourable George Lord Anson, and Published under his Direction, by Richard Walter, M.A., Chaplain of his Majesty’s Ship the Centurion, in that Expedition.

London: John and Paul Knapton for the author, 1748.

4to (249 x 201mm), pp. [2 (title, verso blank)], [3 (dedication)], [1 (blank)], [12 (list of subscribers)], [4 (contents and errata)], [11 (introduction)], [1 (blank)], 417, [1 (blank)], [2 (directions to the binder)]; 42 folding plates and charts; some light browning and spotting, some plates with short, skilfully-repaired tears and marginal marking and/or chipping, a few deeper tears; early 19th-century half calf over marbled boards (one endpaper watermarked ‘1808’), spine gilt in compartments, gilt morocco lettering-piece in one, all edges speckled red; rubbed, joints neatly repaired and hinges skilfully reinforced, corners bumped; provenance: John Crellius (contemporary ownership signature on title) – R.B. Mills (tipped in note on front free endpaper: ‘From R. B. Mills to Mr. J. Addinall as a slight memento of his gallant rescue of his son Richard Bales Mills from drowning in the river Ouse at Kendal Bridge York July 11th 1901’) – H.L.C. Aked (tipped in visiting card on front free endpaper, noting that it was a wedding present on 25 November 1949 to:) – George Gosselin Marten (d. 1997, engraved armorial bookplate on upper pastedown).

£3000

Approximately:
US $3936€3355

Make an enquiry

First edition. ‘Anson’s voyage of 1740-44 holds a unique and terrible place in British maritime history. The misadventures of this attempt by Royal Navy ships to sail round the world make a dramatic story of hardship, disaster, mutiny and endurance [...]. [When] Anson reached the coast of China in November 1742 he was left with one ship and a handful of men, some of whom had “turned mad and idiots”. The most extraordinary part of the voyage was still to come, for despite his losses Anson was determined to seize the treasure galleon that made the annual voyage from Acapulco to Manila. Laden with Peruvian silver, she was the “Prize of all the Oceans”. In June 1743 Anson intercepted the Nuestra Señora de Covadonga, and in a 90-minute action forced her surrender. After refitting at Canton he returned home the next year to find himself compared with Drake, and his exploits with the long-remembered feats of arms against the Spain of Philip II. The casualties were forgotten as the public celebrated a rare triumph in a drab and interminable war [...], and in 1748 the long-awaited authorised account appeared under the name of Richard Walter, chaplain on the Centurion, and became a best-seller. Walter’s volume has formed the basis of all accounts of Anson’s voyage from the mid-eighteenth century to the present. The book, more fully illustrated than any similar work up to that time, was both a stirring story of adventure at sea and an exhortation to further Pacific enterprise’ (Glyn Williams, The Prize of all the Oceans. The Triumph and Tragedy of Anson’s Voyage round the World, 1999, pp. xvii-xviii; and for the long-standing dispute over authorship see appendix I: Williams concludes that Walter may have commenced the work and saw it through the press, but Benjamin Robins, a talented and versatile mathematician and an experienced writer, was primarily responsible for its literary quality. There is, however, no doubt that Anson closely scrutinised the text and in everything except stylistic terms the narrative is Anson’s own interpretation of events).

This is a subscriber’s copy, from the collection of John Crellius whose signature appears on the title page and is listed as a subscriber on (a)1r, and is the ordinary paper issue (copies were also issued on large (‘royal’) paper).

Alden 748/225; Borba de Moraes p. 38; Hill 1817; Kroepelien 1086; Sabin 101175.

You may also be interested in...

'ONE OF THE FOUNDATION STONES OF AN EXPLORATION COLLECTION' LEICHHARDT, Friedrich Wilhelm Ludwig.

Journal of an Overland Expedition in Australia, from Moreton Bay to Port Essington, a Distance of upwards of 3000 Miles, during the Years 1844-1845. [Edited by Phillip Parker King.]

First edition thus. Between 1842 and 1844, Leichhardt (1813-1848) had conducted short scientific explorations in the area around Sydney and between Newcastle and the Moreton Bay District. He had hoped to join the proposed overland expedition, which Sir Thomas Mitchell, the surveyor-general, was willing to lead, from Sydney to Port Essington, but Governor Gipps refused to sanction a venture 'of so hazardous a nature' without the knowledge and consent of the Colonial Office. Leichhardt, irked by this attitude, chose to form his own private party of volunteers, funded by private subscription: 'Six including Leichhardt sailed from Sydney on 13 August 1844. In the Moreton Bay District four more members joined the expedition, which left Jimbour, the farthest outpost of settlement on the Darling Downs, on 1 October. Two of the party turned back and on 28 June 1845 John Gilbert was killed in an attack on Leichhardt's camp by Aboriginals. The remaining seven reached Port Essington on 17th December 1845, completing an overland journey of nearly 3000 miles [...] Returning in the Heroine, Leichhardt arrived in Sydney on 25 March 1846. As it was believed that his party had perished their unexpected success was greeted with great rejoicing. Leichhardt was hailed as "Prince of Explorers" and their achievement was rewarded by a government grant of £1000 and private subscriptions amounting to over £1500' (ADB Online).

Read more

CHANDLER’S TRAVELS IN GREECE: ‘THE ACCOUNT OF ATHENS IS VERY IMPORTANT; IT WAS THE MOST DETAILED CHANDLER, Richard.

Travels in Greece: or an Account of a Tour made at the Expense of the Society of Dilettanti.

First edition. The classical scholar, traveller, and author Chandler (bap. 1737, d. 1810) was educated at Winchester College and Queen’s College, Oxford, and awarded a demyship at Magdalen College in 1757. Following the publication of an annotated collection of fragments by Tyrtaeus, Simonides, Theognis, Alcaeus, Sappho, and other Greek poets in 1759, Chandler published a catalogue of the Arundel marbles in 1763 as Marmora Oxoniensis. ‘In 1764 Chandler was introduced to the Society of Dilettanti by Robert Wood, editor of The Ruins of Palmyra, and was commissioned by the society to undertake a tour of exploration in Asia Minor and Greece in the first independent mission funded by the society. As treasurer he was given command of the expedition, and was accompanied by Nicholas Revett [...] and by the watercolour painter William Edmund Pars. They were instructed to make Smyrna their headquarters and thence “to make excursions to the several remains of antiquity in that neighbourhood”; to make exact plans and measurements; to make “accurate drawings of the bas-reliefs and ornaments”; and to copy all inscriptions, all the while keeping “minute diaries”. Having embarked from Gravesend on 9 June 1764 the party spent about a year in Asia Minor [...]. On 20 August 1765 they left Smyrna for Athens, where Chandler gloomily noted that the Parthenon was in danger of being completely destroyed. He bought two fragments of the Parthenon frieze that had been built into houses in the town and was presented with a trunk that had fallen from one of the metopes and lay neglected in a garden. Although the party visited other parts of the Greek mainland their plans to visit Ithaca, Cephallonia, and Corfu were abandoned, principally because of the group's poor health’ (ODNB).

Read more