Common of Martyrs; a complete folio leaf

Italy, Bologna, late 13th century.

A complete folio leaf, seven lines of text written in brown ink in a rounded gothic script, square and lozenge-shaped musical notation on 4-line red staves, long historiated initial ‘I’ (165 x 31 mm) depicting the full standing figure of a haloed martyr holding a palm branch and book, within an architectural frame, painted in blue and orange against a dark yellow ground; slightly soiled, some minor flaking of architectural frame of historiated initial, but generally in good condition. 482 x 345 mm (360 x 256 mm)

£1800

Approximately:
US $2451€2022

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Common of Martyrs; a complete folio leaf

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Another leaf from the same manuscript with an historiated initial depicting Christ between two haloed figures in one compartment, and a sheep between two wolves in another compartment, was Quaritch Catlogue 1088, no. 48. For the predominance of an orange and blue palette in medieval Bolognese painting see F. Avril, M. T. Gousset and C. Rabel, Manuscrits enluminés d’origine italienne, 1984, vol. 2 plates C–H; and Alessandro Conti, La miniatura bolognese: scuole e botteghe 1270–1340, 1981, coloured plates.

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