Elements of physics or natural philosophy. By Neil Arnott ... Seventh edition, edited by Alexander Bain ... and Alfred Swaine Taylor ...

London, Longmans, Green and Co., 1876.

8vo, pp. xix, [1 (blank)], 873, [1]; [2], 32 (publishers' adverts); photographic portrait of author as frontispiece, numerous diagrams within the text; very occasional light foxing, creases to a couple of corners; very good in publishers' dark brown cloth, gilt-lettered spine, brown endpapers; extremities very slightly rubbed; inscription to front free endpaper, 'F.J Methold Esq with the affectionate regards of his father in law Alfred S. Taylor August 1876', with Methold's armorial bookplate to front pastedown; newspaper cutting with obituary of Bain tipped onto title verso.

£250

Approximately:
US $278€284

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Elements of physics or natural philosophy. By Neil Arnott ... Seventh edition, edited by Alexander Bain ... and Alfred Swaine Taylor ...

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Presentation copy of the seventh edition of Arnott's classic work, which first appeared in 1827 and was translated into every major European language. One of the founders of the University of London and physician-extraordinary to Queen Victoria, Arnott invented one of the first forms of the waterbed.

This copy was presented by the editor, Alfred Swaine Taylor (1806–1880), to his son-in-law Frederick Methold (1841–1907), who had married his only daughter Edith in 1865.

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