County of the Isle of Ely, Public Air Raid Warning.

County Air Raid Precautions Committee, [c. 1943].

Letterpress poster in red, 21 ½ x 31 ½ in (55 x 80 cm); linen backed with minor repairs, otherwise fine.

£300

Approximately:
US $377€334

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County of the Isle of Ely, Public Air Raid Warning.

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A very rare survival from the Second World War. During the war, Cambridgeshire and the Isle of Ely were strategic positions as home to 28 airfields for both the RAF and the USAAF. The flat topography, proximity to the coast and continental Europe made it an ideal location for runways and bases.

Air Raid Precautions (ARP) was set up in 1924, and was dedicated to the protection of civilians from the danger of air-raids. The extensive air raid warning system covered every village, town and city in the UK during WWII. In the Cold War, much of the same system was used to warn of nuclear attacks until it was decommissioned in 1993.

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