THE CATALOGUE OF ATABEY'S REMARKABLE LIBRARY RELATING TO THE OTTOMAN EMPIRE AND THE MIDDLE EAST

The Ottoman World. The Sefik E. Atabey Collection. Books, Manuscripts and Maps.

London: Bernard J. Shapero, 1998.

2 volumes, folio (335 x 235mm), pp. I: [8], 372, [4 (blank)]; II: [4], 373-757, [3 (blank)]; colour-printed illustrations in the text, many full-page; original red boards, lettered and decorated in gilt, light-brown endpapers; a fine set.

£600

Approximately:
US $768€672

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First and only edition, limited to 750 sets. A comprehensive catalogue of Sefik E. Atabey's remarkable library of some 1,370 pre-1854 books, manuscripts, and maps relating to the Ottoman Empire and the Middle East. Each item is carefully described and annotated, and the catalogue is supplemented by indices of authors, editors, artists, engravers, binders, and subscribers; selected places and subject; and the titles of anonymous publications.

The work is an important addition to the reference literature on the subject, and can be considered complementary to Navari's earlier Greece and the Levant: the Catalogue of the Henry Myron Blackmer Collection (London: 1989). The collection (which was sold en bloc in the late 1990s) was particularly notable for the number of works it contained from celebrated libraries, including those of Britwell Court, the duc de La Rochefoucauld at Roche-Guyon, the Duke of Portland, the Duke of Marlborough, the Earls Fitzwilliam, Charles X of France, and Czar Nicholas I of Russia (a number in fine armorial bindings), which are identified in the separate index of provenances.

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