The Meditations of Saint Augustine, from the Latin Original. By the Rev. J. Martin, O.S.A. …

Dublin: Printed for the Author, by H. Fitzpatrick … 1798

12mo., pp. [12], 183, [9, index]; lightly foxed but a good copy in contemporary sheep, spine with remains of paper label; boards chipped, joints starting; inscription on front pastedown: ‘Hassop Mission [Derbyshire] 11 March 1852'.

£1250

Approximately:
US $1580€1403

Add to basket Make an enquiry

Added to your basket:
The Meditations of Saint Augustine, from the Latin Original. By the Rev. J. Martin, O.S.A. …

Checkout now

First edition of this rare translation of the pseudo-Augustinian Meditationum Liber, an eleventh-century devotional text very popular in the Middle Ages.

The translator, John Martin, was an Augustinian friar who became a fervent activist within the Society of United Irishmen. His political conversion (and this book) coincided with the outbreak of the rebellion of 1798, in which he took a number of increasingly dangerous commissions from the Dublin United Irish Committee, but he has been largely neglected in the historiography of the rebellion; his stance suited neither loyalists nor rebel apologists, and he remains an enigmatic figure.

Daire Keogh, ‘“The most dangerous villain in society”; Fr. John Martin’s Mission to the United Irishmen of Wicklow in 1798’, Eighteenth-Century Ireland, 7, (1992), pp. 115-135.

ESTC records copies at the British Library, National Library of Ireland, and Illinois only.

You may also be interested in...

THE UFFINGTON HORSE WISE, Francis.

A Letter to Dr Mead concerning some Antiquities in Berkshire, particularly shewing that the White Horse, which gives its name to the Vale, is a Monument of the West-Saxons, made in Memory of a great Victory obtained over the Danes A. D. 871 … . [With:]

First editions. A Letter to Dr Mead was the first serious archaeological study of the Uffington White Horse. Francis Wise, Keeper of the Archives at Oxford University and later a friend of Samuel Johnson, contends that the horse, which he eulogises as a work of art, had Saxon origins, because of the common use of horse motifs in Saxon decoration. His most enduring antiquarian contribution, however, is to link the nearby long barrow Wayland’s Smithy to the legendary Saxon figure Weland.

Read more

SOCIAL UNREST COLERIDGE, Samuel Taylor.

“Blessed are ye that sow beside all Waters!” A Lay Sermon, addressed to the higher and middle Classes, on the existing Distresses and Discontents …

First edition of Coleridge’s second ‘Lay Sermon’, addressing the social unrest that followed the end of the Napoleonic Wars, published in March 1817. A third intended ‘sermon’, to be addressed to the lower classes, was never in fact completed.

Read more