The Way to Christ Discovered.

Manchester, Joseph Harrop, 1752.

8vo, pp. 360; a few leaves a little browned or stained; a very good copy in panelled calf.

£650

Approximately:
US $909€737

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The scarce and handsomely printed first Manchester edition of H. Blunden’s English translation (first, 1648), edited by John Byrom, poet and inventor of a shorthand system, who had been introduced to Böhme’s writings by William Law.

Buddecke II, 62; ESTC t124476.

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