The Essayes or Counsels, civill and morall … Newly enlarged.

London, Printed by John Haviland … 1632.

Small 4to., pp. [10], 340, [38], wanting the initial and terminal blanks; title-page heavily soiled and laid down at inner margin, B4 remargined; a few reader’s notes; in later sheep, upper joint strengthened.

£650

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US $852€727

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Third edition of the definitive text of Bacon’s Essayes, first published in 1625. The first edition appeared in 1597 comprising only ten short essays; in 1612 these were revised and a further twenty-eight essays added. The 1625 edition contained fifty-eight essays, twenty of them new, and the rest revised; this final version was reprinted many times throughout the seventeenth century

STC 1150; Gibson 16.

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