Quaesitum novum pulcherrimum, ac optatissimum contra Scotum, ac communem viam in quo enucleatur an de subiecto praecognoscatur si est aut de eodem aliqua demonstrationis spetie inquiratur ... Ioanne Elysio ... dilucidatore, atq[ue] locupletatore.

Naples, Raymundus Amatus, 1557.

Two works in one vol., fol., ff. 8; [4]; text in double columns, woodcut initials; some light foxing and staining to first work; very good copies in recent blue/grey paper wrappers.

£1950

Approximately:
US $2410€2164

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Quaesitum novum pulcherrimum, ac optatissimum contra Scotum, ac communem viam in quo enucleatur an de subiecto praecognoscatur si est aut de eodem aliqua demonstrationis spetie inquiratur ... Ioanne Elysio ... dilucidatore, atq[ue] locupletatore.

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Scarce first editions of two early works on Aristotelian logic by Girolamo Balduino, an important member of the Paduan school of Aristotelian commentators who have been recognised in recent scholarship as a crucial link between traditional logic and science and the new, Galilean methodologies. In addition to Averroes, Albertus Magnus, Aquinas, and Duns Scotus, these works make reference to Balduino’s fellow Paduan philosophers Thomas Cajetan, Agostino Nifo, Marcantonio Zimara, and Giovanni Francesco Burana.

Balduino greatest success came during his years in Naples, where both of these works were published. His balanced assessment of the usefulness and limitations of Aristotelian logic in modern science met its most vocal opponent in Giacomo Zabarella, whose largely unwarranted attack upon Balduino generated a prolific diatribe. The result was a new separation of philosophy from theology and then metaphysics. Though Balduino’s thought cannot be strictly considered an immediate precursor of Galileo’s work, it is nonetheless the case that it played an important role in the formation of the scientist’s thinking on logic and science: Galileo cites Balduino’s Questions in his works on epistemology and logic preserved in the manuscript MS Gal 46 (see Wallace, Prelude to Galileo, Essays on Medieval and Sixteenth-Century Sources, p. 197).

EDIT 16 4023, USTC 812086; EDIT 16 4020, USTC 812084. Outside Italy we have only traced copies of the first work at Chicago and Texas, and of the second work at Texas only.

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