COUNT UGLY’S MASKED BALL

Stated in a Dialogue betwixt a Prude and a Coquet, last Masquerade Night, the 12th of May …

London: Printed for J. Roberts … 1724.

Folio, pp. [2], 8; a good copy, disbound.

£2250

Approximately:
US $2914€2599

Add to basket Make an enquiry

Added to your basket:
Stated in a Dialogue betwixt a Prude and a Coquet, last Masquerade Night, the 12th of May …

Checkout now

First edition, rare, of an amusing verse dialogue between two women preparing to attend one of the popular masquerade balls staged by the Swiss impresario John James Heidegger. Hilaria, a coquette, is effusive about the pleasures of the imminent party and she offers a tempting vision of the delights of the masquerade: ‘so vast the crowds, so num’rous are the lights / … I Chat, – I Laugh, – I Dance, – with Coquet’s Art, / Play over all my Tricks; – yet keep my heart.’ Her friend Lucretia, a prude, is sceptical, though her warnings are somewhat undermined by the crude sexual puns in which she frames her advice:

The Fort of Chastity does shew some Strength,
Its Fossè too of goodly Depth and Length;
But then if Man produces one Great Gun,
The Fort’s demolish’d, and our Sex undone.

The conversation ends with a comic twist: the prudish Lucretia, now converted by Hilaria, departs for the Ball to meet Philander (who, inconstant wretch, is sworn to Hilaria).

John James Heidegger played a notable role in the introduction of Italian opera to London. His masked balls were hugely popular among the upper classes at the beginning of the eighteenth century, in part because of their notoreity for licentious behavour, and tickets were sold for as much as a guinea and a half each. Success brought less welcome attention too, and Heidegger, who was also famed for his ugliness, was satirised in prints by Hogarth, in verse by Pope, and as ‘Count Ugly’ by Swift.

ESTC shows six copies: BL (2 copies), Manchester Central Library; Harvard, Texas, and Yale.

Foxon B 20, Ashley Library, IX, 80.

You may also be interested in...

JOHN EVELYN’S COPIES BLACKMORE, Richard.

Prince Arthur. An Heroick Poem. In Ten Books … London: Printed for Awnsham and John Churchil … 1695. [With:]
BLACKMORE, Richard. King Arthur. An Heroick Poem. In twelve Books … to which is annexed an Index, explaining the Names of Countrys, Citys, and Rivers, &c. London: Printed for Awnsham and John Churchil … and Jacob Tonson … 1697.

First edition of Blackmore’s first epic poem, with the first edition of its sequel – John Evelyn’s copies, with shelfmarks ‘E5:1’ and ‘E5:2’ in his hand, Prince Arthur additionally inscribed ‘Catalogo Evelini Inscriptus / Meliora Retinete’ (Evelyn’s motto: ‘Keep the best’).

Read more

POPE, Alexander.

Windsor-Forest. To the Right Honourable George Lord Lansdown …

First edition of Pope’s second separately published poem, preceded by An Essay on Criticism in 1711. Written in the tradition that young poets begin with pastoral verse, Windsor-Forest, with its epigraph from Virgil’s Eclogues, was the poem that first won Swift’s regard and laid foundations for the ‘most celebrated literary friendship of the earlier eighteenth century’ (Oxford DNB).

Read more