La marechallerie françoise, où le traitté de la connoissance des chevaux, du jugement et remede de leur maladie.

Paris, Sebastien Piquet, 1654.

4to, pp. [8], 105, [2], [1 (blank)]; large armorial copper-engraving to a2v, full-page copper-engraving by Isaac Briot in text, copper-engraved head-piece to dedication, woodcut head-piece and initials, without the 1651 engraved frontispiece called for by Menessier; damp-stain from top-edge, foxing in places, short cut to gutter A2-4 (not affecting text); stab-sewn and secured in a contemporary limp-vellum casing by two vellum thongs; lower thong split at front hinge with short tear to casing, a few small marks; upper pastedown inscribed ‘J.J.P. M.C. 1723’, later eighteenth-century inscription of François Marie Arnold to pastedown and printed booklabel of ‘Arnold zum Löwen’ to upper cover.

£1200

Approximately:
US $1648€1406

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Third edition, expanded, of a very rare treatise, first published in 1623 and discussing the selection of a horse and its subsequent care, including several suggested remedies for each equine malady.

‘Published slightly before Jacques de Solleysel’s important work, Baret de Rouvray’s book holds a place of its own because it is one of the best books on the subject before the great French authors of the second half of the seventeenth century began publishing their works. Baret’s work is an important witness of the standards of horsemanship and horse medicine of the period between Antiquity and the Middle Ages on the one hand, and the more modern standards espoused by the authors of the following generations on the other.’ (Dejager, p. 378).

According to Mennessier, the present copy is a reissue of the 1645 edition, under a new title and with a cancel title-page. Only two institutional copies could be found worldwide (Science Museum and Sandomierz). Other editions are equally scarce.

Mennessier I, p. 71; Dingley 30; cf. Dejager 178 and pp. 378-381.

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SOLLEYSEL, Jacques de, and William HOPE (translator).

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