Lu Xun’s Legacy. Printmaking in Modern China: an exhibition of prints from the Muban Educational Trust.

London, 2020

4to (25 x 23 cm), pp. 182; colour and b/w illustrations throughout; wrappers.

£20

Approximately:
US $25€22

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Lu Xun’s Legacy. Printmaking in Modern China: an exhibition of prints from the Muban Educational Trust.

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A catalogue produced to accompany a travelling exhibition to be held in Edinburgh, Durham and London, which illustrates and describes 132 colour and black-and-white Chinese woodblock prints dating from the 1930s to the present day.
The author Lu Xun (1881-1936) revitalized the tradition of woodblock printing in China in the 1930s and this exhibition traces its development and progression from then on. Whilst there are many fine early prints, this catalogue is testament to the extraordinary talent of the younger generation of artists from the 1980s onwards. Accompanied by Introductory essays, this is a very worthwhile and enjoyable contribution to the history of printmaking in China.

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