A letter addressed to the people of Piedmont, on the advantages of the French Revolution, and the necessity of adopting its principles in Italy. Translated from the French by the author.

New York, Columbian Press, 1795.

12mo, pp. iv, 5-45, [1] advertisements; some foxing, mainly marginal, and heavier on final leaf, but otherwise clean; in later grey wrappers.

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A letter addressed to the people of Piedmont, on the advantages of the French Revolution, and the necessity of adopting its principles in Italy. Translated from the French by the author.

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First American edition. Evans 28237.

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