Étude des mouvements et des temps... troisème édition traduit de l’américain par Le Bureau des Temps Élémentaires.

Paris, Les Editions d’organisation, 1949.

8vo, pp. xiii, [3], 560, [4]; with numerous half-tone illustrations and diagrams throughout; original publisher’s cloth, spine lettered gilt, worn.

£100

Approximately:
US $127€109

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Third edition, first published in 1937.

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